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Bose QuietComfort Earbuds vs Jabra Elite 85T: Which Should You Buy

To find out which pair of noise-cancelling wireless Bluetooth headphones is the best, we compared the Bose QuietComfort Earbuds and the Jabra Elite 85T. At the end of 2020, two major players have launched their true wireless headphones with active noise reduction: Bose and Jabra. However, these are indeed two very different approaches that have been taken by the two brands. So what are the best noise-cancelling Bluetooth headphones between the two models shown? This is what we will see in this comparison.

Whether it’s design, comfort, noise reduction quality, sound quality, features or battery life, we’re going to sift through both pairs of headphones to find out which are the best. both.

General

Bose QC EarbudsJabra Elite 85T
BrandBoseJabra
TypeIn-EarIn-Ear
ColorsTriple Black, SoapstoneTitanium Black 
Battery life6 Hours30 Hours
Weight8.5 grams (each)52 grams
ConnectivityBluetoothBluetooth

Design

Bose QC EarbudsJabra Elite 85T
TypeClosed, dynamicClosed, dynamic
WirelessYesYes
Noise CancellingYesYes
Weight8.5 grams (each)52 grams
Foldable DesignNoNo

The difference in approach between the two pairs of headphones can be seen at first glance. It must be said that in terms of design, Bose and Jabra have made very different choices. On the Bose side, the QC Earbuds come in an imposing case, to say the least, that will have trouble fitting in a jeans pocket. The same goes for the headphones themselves, which are particularly bulky and tend to stick out of the ear pinna.

Nevertheless, the Bose QC Earbuds have a major advantage with their silicone tips. Not only are they supplemented by a fin that provides good support, but it is not really intra-auricular, since the flexible tips are housed at the entrance to the ear canal, not completely inside.

As for Jabra, a more classic approach has been favored. The housing is much more compact, like the headphones themselves. They are also classic in-ear headphones. The headphones, once in the ears, are rather discreet and very comfortable, as long as you are not bothered by this type of headphones.

Overall, the Bose headphones, therefore, have the advantage of being very comfortable and well maintained, even after several hours of use, when those from Jabra may be more annoying, but take advantage of the compactness of the case and their discretion. It is, therefore, a draw on this first round.

Features

Bose QC EarbudsJabra Elite 85T
USBUSB-CUSB-C
MicrophoneYesYes
Music ControlsYes, Touch SensorYes, Touch Sensor
Quick ChargeYesYes, 10 Minutes
= 1 Hours
Stereo speakersNoNo

Whether it’s the Bose QC Earbuds or the Jabra Elite 85T, both pairs of headphones feature a highly effective active noise reduction system.

To do this, Jabra headphones rely on two microphones per earpiece, one inside and one outside. 11 levels are therefore offered, between total noise reduction and complete transparency to hear all the sounds around. The noise reduction proposed here effectively filters out the more persistent noises such as the sound of a fan, traffic noise or the hum of a train. The headphones, however, have difficulty filtering out voices or more punctual sounds.

This is precisely where the Bose QC Earbuds shine. The American manufacturer offers ten levels of ambient noise reduction. Above all, it is very effective at filtering out all the sounds around you, whether it’s lingering sounds or more punctual noises. Even the voices, more complicated to process, are much reduced. Enough to ensure you can stay focused while working, despite the chatter around you. The headphones allow you to be isolated in your bubble, even without having to start the music to hide noise pollution.

As for the reduction of ambient noise, it is the Bose QuietComfort Earbuds which therefore win the round.

Connectivity

Bose QC EarbudsJabra Elite 85T
BluetoothBluetooth 5.1Bluetooth 5.0
Bluetooth RangeApprox. 10 meterApprox. 10 meter
NFCNoNo
Multi-Device
Connection
YesYes

For audio quality, the two headphones offer a sound more oriented towards the bass and midrange. They are also compatible with the same Bluetooth codecs: SBC and AAC. Neither pair, therefore, offers aptX or LDAC.

The Bose QC Earbuds offer a very focused sound on the bass with a lot of warmth. The highs, a little more behind, are not erased. But it is especially on the soundstage that the QuietComfort Earbuds stand out with a wide stage and excellent spatialization. The dynamics are also up to par, but we can note an overall compression of the track, noticeable in particular on titles rich in instruments.

Note that Bose does not offer an equalizer in its application, but a system called active sound equalization. What in principle automatically adjust the sound to the shape of your ear or surrounding noises. For the management of voice calls, the earphones only offer a very low noise reduction for your interlocutor who will be able to clearly hear all the noises around you.

On the Jabra side, the Elite 85Ts have 12mm, drivers. The sound is, again, very focused on the bass. However, it is especially the lower mids and vocals that are the most emphasized. The highs are audible but tend to be drowned out throughout the low end. The headphones lack a bit of balance by default on this side, without the sound is unpleasant. We have a warm sound that is designed to appeal to the greatest number.

For others, the Sound + app includes an equalizer with five bands and several presets. Enough to change the sound signature of the headphones by enhancing the treble, for example. Note also that the headphones offer good dynamics, a wide scene and, above all, more detailed than the Bose QC Earbuds. On the call side, however, the Jabra Elite 85T does not work miracles and only roughly filter the surrounding sounds for your interlocutor.

In terms of audio quality, if the Bose QC Earbuds offer a more balanced sound by default, the Jabra Elite 85T can modify it thanks to an integrated equalizer. In addition, they offer a more detailed and less compressed sound, more effective in jazz or classical music. For this reason, we will therefore prefer Jabra headphones.

Battery

Bose QC EarbudsJabra Elite 85T
Battery TypeLi-polymerLi-polymer
Battery Life31 Hours31 Hours
Charge TimeApprox. 2.5-3 hoursApprox. 2.5-3 hours
Charging PortUSB-CUSB-C

The two pairs of headphones offer a fairly decent battery life, even with noise reduction activated to the maximum. At Bose, the QuietComfort Earbuds were able to hold out for a little over seven hours. Charging once the headphones are in the case will take fifty minutes to go from 0 to 100% battery. Finally, the case is compatible with wireless charging in addition to USB-C. It is, therefore, a faultless side of the QC Earbuds.

For their part, the Jabra Elite 85T, with noise reduction pushed to the maximum, will be able to operate for a little over six hours before running out of battery. Recharging the headphones will take 1h12 in the case. Finally, note that the box is also compatible with induction charging in addition to USB-C.

Whether it’s the battery life of the headphones or their charging speed in the case, the Bose QC Earbuds do better than the Jabra Elite 85T.

Conclusion!

At the end of this match, it’s a draw in terms of points. While headphones from Bose dominate the sleeves of battery life and noise reduction, the Jabra Elite 85T offers a better sound experience and greater comfort of use and functionality. In terms of design and ease of use, it will all depend on your preferences between in-ear headphones and larger headphones.

Overall, Jabra headphones still have the advantage of being much more complete in terms of their functionality and allowing fine tuning of the sound experience, where Bose headphones are true to the philosophy of the brand: to be as simple as possible to use, without frills. If you prefer headphones that you can fine tune – and use with multiple devices – we recommend the Jabra Elite 85T. If you prefer a straightforward experience, go for the headphones from Bose instead.

AUDIO

JABRA ELITE 75T vs JABRA ELITE 85T: True Wireless Earbuds

Today we bring you in scoop a comparison and analysis of the recently released Jabra Elite 85t that the Copenhagen brand launches on the market, and we will compare them with their little brothers, the Elite 75t. We will see a comparison in technical characteristics, quality, technology, and price. Who will win the battle? We see it!

Taking a look at both models, we see that both come in a uniform design in Gray and Yellow colors with a minimalist finish as far as the box is concerned. On the front, we can see a capture of the headphones, as well as some of its most outstanding specifications. On the back, it will detail without over-enlarging so as not to overload the nice box with literature, a summary of the main characteristics, as well as a capture of the case.

In the case of the Elite 75t box, as you can see, it is of a somewhat larger size, without the need for so much packaging as we found in the Elite 85t in which they have already improved this aspect.

Inside the Elite 85t and after removing them from the box, we will find the case itself and headphones, along with a kit of gel spare parts of various sizes, in this case, the S and L, since the M size are installed in the headset, and after lifting the flap, the back contains a USB charging cable and quick start guide that is of little use to us because we will configure them in the app.

General

JABRA ELITE 75TJABRA ELITE 85T
BrandJabraJabra
TypeIn EarIn Ear
ColorsCopper Black, Mint, Navy
Sienna
Titanium Black 
Battery life7.5 Hours Buds
28 Hours Case
30 Hours
Weight46 g52 grams
ConnectivityBluetooth, NFCBluetooth

Design

JABRA ELITE 75TJABRA ELITE 85T
TypeIn EarIn Ear
WirelessYesYes
Noise CancellingYesYes
Weight46 g52 grams
Foldable DesignNoNo

Starting with the Elite 85T Headphones, which from the outset we will tell you are within Jabra’s range of completely wireless headphones, the first thing we see as soon as unboxing is its charging case, which has been made of ABS plastic of good weight and in black with oval contours, its dimensions being 64.8 x 41.1 x 28.5 mm. On the front of it, we find the Jabra logo, under which a led is installed that will be in charge of showing us both the charging status and the flashing situation when we install an update (It blinks purple while updating and turns off when concluding).

The charging connector is located on the rear and is type C. Jabra only includes a cable with a USB type A connector at one end and type C to the charging case. It is understood that today we all have mobile chargers of this type, USB ports on the PC, and much more, so they have preferred to save costs on this component. The Bluetooth technology that they integrate is 5.1 and has a range of approximately 10m or a little less if we have walls in between.

The size of the headset is perfect, neither big nor small, fitting perfectly in our ear thanks to the three-size silicone inserts provided by Jabra, and under which they will adapt to any ear like a glove. We have used them at home, on a motorcycle, and even running and we guarantee that the fit and comfort are perfect. In fact, in the following screenshot, you can see the difference in size (despite the technology they install) compared to Airpods, Bose, or Beats for example.

Features

JABRA ELITE 75TJABRA ELITE 85T
USBUSB-CUSB-C
MicrophoneYesYes
Music ControlsYesYes, Touch Sensor
Quick ChargeNoYes, 10 Minutes
= 1 Hours
Stereo speakersYesNo

Battery

JABRA ELITE 75TJABRA ELITE 85T
Battery Type2 Lithium ionLi-polymer
Battery Life7.5 Hours Buds
28 Hours Case
31 Hours
Charge TimeApprox. 1.5 HoursApprox. 2.5-3 hours
Charging PortUSB-CUSB-C

The battery is lithium-ion, and has Qi wireless charging technology, with the charging time of the wired case being about 3h and 3.5h with wireless charging (depending on the charging device we have it may be something higher).

Connectivity

JABRA ELITE 75TJABRA ELITE 85T
BluetoothBluetooth 5.0Bluetooth 5.0
Bluetooth RangeApprox. 15 meterApprox. 10 meter
NFCYesNo
Multi-Device
Connection
YesYes

Comparing with the Elite 75t, the cargo box is identical characteristics regarding his older brother the 85t, equally including connector loading at the rear of C type of 30cm in length.

The materials used are also made of PC Plastic and ABS in black, so as we indicated little variation and/or improvement have been applied in this box that already works more than correctly and gives us an autonomy of 5.5h (ANC ) – 18.5h (Housing). Its charging time is obviously somewhat less than the Elite 85t, in this case, half an hour less (3h) since it offers us almost 7h less of total autonomy.

In this case, we are dealing with an open-type headset but whose size is half that of the 85t, in this case, 6mm, integrating 4 microphones (2 Interior + 2 Exterior), 2 per headset, which it uses for noise reduction. outside, using just 2 for the staging of Jabra ANC sound insulation technology. It also includes HearThrough technology that we explained above, so both headphones in this sense are served.

Conclusion!

There are many reasons, but among others, we will tell you that the best ergonomics, size, speaker size, state-of-the-art technology with total isolation capacity or to allow us to listen to our surroundings, the possibility of very precisely equalizing treble and bass, geolocation, autonomy … But above all its enormous audio quality in multimedia and in calls.

The Elite 85t are obviously a leap in the quality of materials and finishes over the 75t, as well as having a speaker that doubles in size, drastically improves the depth of the bass and clarity of treble, as well as having a greater technology and microphones installed to enhance even more if possible compared to the 75t in terms of acoustic insulation and improvement in call quality. 

 
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AUDIO

Compare: LG Tone Free FN6 vs Sony WF-1000XM3

Announced in January 2021, the LG Tone Free FN6 headphones are wireless and in-ear, having a Bluetooth 5.0 connection and supporting SBC and AAC codecs. Autonomy side, 18 hours of listening at the most and a possibility of fast charging (1 hour of listening for 5 minutes of charge). They are IPX4 certified (splash resistant) and feature a charging case that acts as a UV sterilizer. LG’s Tone Free FN6 headphones feature an in-ear design and UV-C sterilization function, all for a price of less than $ 150.

The WF-1000XM3 are Sony’s new premium noise-canceling true wireless headphones. The manufacturer has integrated two codecs, AAC and SBC, so we do not find the Hi-Res standard. Their strong point, in addition to the sound quality, is the autonomy: 4 hours with noise reduction activated.

Sony has renewed its true wireless in-ear headphones with the WF-1000xM3. Noise reduction, touch control, battery life advertised as up to 32 hours (case included), and intelligent functions. The Sony WF-1000xM3 is on paper the best alternative to LG’s Tone Free FN6.

Pros and Cons

LG Tone Free FN6Sony WF-1000XM3
Eight-band equalizerExcellent autonomy
Ease of useEffective active noise reduction
Functions of the applicationNo multipoint
Very average sound qualityThe terrible touch controls
Fairly average autonomyNo water resistance

General

LG Tone Free FN6Sony WF-1000XM3
$CHECK PRICECHECK PRICE
BrandLGSony
TypeIn EarIn Ear
ColorsBlackBlack, Silver
Battery life5 Hours (Talk)
6 Hours (Music)
Up to 15 hours
Weight6g Each
40g (Case)
8.5g Each
79.4g (Case)
ConnectivityWireless, BluetoothWireless, Bluetooth

LG Tone Free FN6

The LG Tone Free earphones each have a 6mm transducer to output sound. In addition, to design its headphones, LG has partnered with the British Hi-Fi brand Meridian, responsible for managing the digital signal processing as well as the equalization presets offered in the application. In terms of audio codecs, on the other hand, the Tone Free FN6 is content with the minimum compatibility only with AAC and SBC codecs. AptX and LDAC are therefore not supported.

Sony WF-1000XM3

The Sony WF-1000xM3 skip LDAC, Sony’s audio technology that achieves wireless speeds of 990 kbps, and even Qualcomm’s aptX. It’s a shame, but we still find the SBC and AAC formats (it’s always better than the Jabra Elite 85h which did not even have AAC) and the in-house DSEE HX engine which improves the rendering of the sound of compressed files (MP3) in order to approach HiRes quality, like the upscaling of 4K TVs, for example, which improve Full HD sources.

Design

LG Tone Free FN6Sony WF-1000XM3
TypeIn EarIn Ear
Dimensions32.8 x 24.9 x 16 cm (Earbud)147.32 x 119.38 x 66.4 mm (Box)
WirelessYesYes
Noise CancellingNoYes
Weight6g Each (Earbud)
40g (Case)
8.5g Each
79.4g (Case)

LG Tone Free FN6

LG headphones are surprisingly small in size. It must be said that it is the round format with a diameter of 5.46 cm and a radius of 2.75 cm. Suffice to say that it slips particularly easily into a jeans pocket or a handbag. The case is otherwise all plastic with a slight non-slip feel, much like a pencil eraser.

LG Tone Free FN6 headphones are in-ear headphones. This means that they have silicone tips that fit inside the ear canal. The advantage of this format is undoubtedly its greater passive sound isolation, but some may be put off by the intrusion effect, or even the sensation of plugging in the ears. Three sizes of tips are supplied with LG headphones, in order to offer everyone the most suitable pair for their body type.

Sony WF-1000XM3

The WF-1000XM3 are Sony’s new premium noise-canceling true wireless headphones. The manufacturer has integrated two codecs, AAC and SBC, so we do not find the Hi-Res standard. Their strong point, in addition to the sound quality, is the autonomy: 4 hours with noise reduction activated.

With 8.5 grams on the scale, they’re a bit heavier than Samsung’s intros, which isn’t really a problem. They stay well attached to the ear and do not weigh on the antitragus. On the other hand, the base is quite prominent and I must admit having had pain in the tragus on prolonged listening. They will therefore be good companions during your sports sessions, but not necessarily the longest.

Features

LG Tone Free FN6Sony WF-1000XM3
USBUSB-CUSB-C
MicrophoneYesYes
Music ControlsYes Yes
Quick ChargeYesYes
SpeakersNoNo

LG Tone Free FN6

The LG Tone Free FN6 allows you to pause the music with one press, modify the volume with two presses – left to decrease or right to increase – or go to the next track with three presses. A long press will finally allow you to switch to transparent mode. By default, if it is possible to go to the next song, it is however impossible to go back to the previous title.

However, these settings can be changed in LG’s Tone Free app, available on both Android and iOS. This application is full of features. In addition to the user manual, accessible directly when opening, it will also allow you to customize the touchpads of the headphones. You can thus modify the parameters for one, two, or three presses, left or right.

Sony WF-1000XM3

The touch controls don’t always respond to finger-to-eye and it’s not uncommon to accidentally tap next to the tiny area, even after more than one. week of use. This has happened to me many times when I wanted to reposition the headset a little to avoid hurting for example. In the end, the result is that it is not uncommon to take out your smartphone to control your music.

Clearly, the active noise reduction of the WF-1000xM3 does not bring the calm of a headband headset that covers the ear much better. Sounds continue to pass. However, this reduction is actually very good compared to other in-ear headphones and already cuts out a lot of external distractions. Note also that active noise reduction is far from being a point often found on true wireless headphones, which makes them rare examples.

Battery

LG Tone Free FN6Sony WF-1000XM3
Battery TypeLi-PoLi-Po
Battery Life5 Hours (Talk)
6 Hours (Music)
Up to 15 hours
Charge Time5 Minutes for 1 Hour3.5 Hours
Charging PortUSB Type-CUSB Type-C

LG Tone Free FN6

The battery of LG Tone Free FN6, the manufacturer has integrated a 55 mAh accumulator in each earpiece allowing use for six consecutive hours of listening. On the case side, we will find a 390 mAh battery allowing 18 additional hours of listening.

For charging, LG announces an hour in the box to fully charge the headphones. However, it only took me 31 minutes to go from 0 to 100% battery. Suffice to say that recharging is fast … very fast. After this recharge, there was still more than 80% battery on the case, initially charged to 100%.

Sony WF-1000XM3

With the box, Sony announces 24 to 32 hours of autonomy, which corresponds roughly to what I was able to experience in mixed-use (around 28 hours). We are therefore clearly at the top of the basket. The only small complaint that some may make: the lack of wireless charging.

Connectivity

LG Tone Free FN6Sony WF-1000XM3
BluetoothBluetooth 5.0Bluetooth 5.0
NFCNoNo
Multi-Device
Connection
NoNo

Which is better!

LG Tone Free FN6

LG headphones are not lacking in quality, unfortunately not where you might expect them most. The headphones are comfortable with thoughtful features and customization of touch controls. The Korean manufacturer also had a good idea to offer a case that allows the headphones to be sterilized once in place. The autonomy is decent, with a little over six hours, but does not do wonders either.

Unfortunately, it is mainly the sound quality that is lacking in the Tone Free FN6. LG headphones sound way too midrange oriented by default. Fortunately, it is possible to change the sound signature thanks to a built-in equalizer. However, the headphones also suffer from a certain saturation, especially on the vocals.

Unfortunately, for a price of over a hundred euros, we can now find much more convincing alternatives, especially for the sound quality. And this is the essence of what is required of wireless headphones.

Sony WF-1000XM3

The Sony WF-1000xM3 are high quality true wireless headphones. If their price is in the upper range, you get what you pay for on absolutely everything. They even managed to convince the refractory to true wireless headphones that I am, that is to say.

Not only is their sound good, much better than that of AirPods for example, but in addition, their autonomy is really excellent and should only let you down in certain extreme cases such as a long-haul flight for example. Finally, active noise reduction is still far too rare a feature on this type of product and it is managed much better here than on the previous generation. It is certainly not as effective as on a headband helmet, but it is already more than enough to cut off from the world and avoid the parasitic noises of open space or a public place.

There are still some elements to improve, such as tactile navigation, the size of the charging box, or the water resistance, but this remains relatively incidental compared to the gain that we will find in sound.

 
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AUDIO

Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro vs Samsung Galaxy Buds Live: True Wireless Headphones

Samsung has launched its new Galaxy Buds Pro headphones, the manufacturer still offers its old models, the Samsung Galaxy Buds Live. Which are the best true wireless headphones? This is what we will see in this comparison.

In the summer of 2020, Samsung launched its first noise-canceling headphones, the Samsung Galaxy Buds Live. Five months later, new models, the Galaxy Buds Pro, succeed them. In the meantime, the Korean manufacturer has also changed the format, moving from an open fit design to in-ear headphones. But which of the Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro or Galaxy Buds Live are the best true wireless noise-canceling headphones?

We are going to compare these two pairs of headphones point by point in this versus, from the comfort of use to the audio quality through the functionalities, the autonomy or the active noise reduction.

General

Samsung Galaxy Buds ProSamsung Galaxy Buds Live
$CHECK PRICECHECK PRICE
BrandSamsungSamsung
TypeIn EarIn Ear
ColorsPhantom Violet, Phantom Black,
Phantom Silver
Mystic White, Mystic Black, Mystic Copper,
Mystic Red, Mystic Blue
Battery lifeUp to 8 hours
(28 with charging case)
Up to 8 hours
(29 with charging case)
Weight6.3g (Earbud)
44.9g (Case)
5.6g (Earbud)
42.2g (Case)
ConnectivityWireless, BluetoothWireless, Bluetooth

We are going to compare these two pairs of headphones point by point in this versus, from the comfort of use to the audio quality through the functionalities, the autonomy, or the active noise reduction. The case of the Galaxy Buds Live on the left and the Galaxy Buds Pro on the right.

The boxes are similar in all respects, both for the shape and form the dimensions, the connectors, or the LEDs indicating the state of charge of the battery. Nonetheless, while the Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro is in-ear format headphones, the Galaxy Buds Live has an open-fit format. Concretely, the first is equipped with silicone tips – with three sizes available – which will fit into the ear canal. This allows better passive isolation and better directivity of the sound, but it may bother some people who do not support this type of headphones.

On both sides, however, we will be able to enjoy an equalizer allowing us to choose between six presets, but unfortunately, no personalized multi-band equalizer is offered in the Galaxy Wearable application.

When it comes to sound quality, it’s clearly the Galaxy Buds Pro that wins the round thanks to a sound that is not only more balanced but above all much more detailed.

Design

Samsung Galaxy Buds ProSamsung Galaxy Buds Live
TypeIn EarIn Ear
Dimensions16.5 x 27.3 x 14.9mm (Earbud)50.0 x 50.2 x 27.8mm (Earbud)
WirelessYesYes
Noise CancellingYesYes
Weight0.2 oz, 1.6 oz0.2 oz, 1.4 oz

The Galaxy Buds Live has a red bean shape. These are headphones that come to rest at the entrance to the auditory canal but do not come to be housed inside it. Obviously, they are less intrusive but offer almost no passive isolation.

On the comfort side, the Galaxy Buds Live are necessarily more comfortable, since they remain outside the ear. They also fit better in the ears than Galaxy Buds Pro. However, the lack of passive sound insulation can be a barrier to use if you plan to wear them in a noisy environment. On this point, it is therefore a draw between the two pairs of headphones.

Features

Samsung Galaxy Buds ProSamsung Galaxy Buds Live
ChipsetBCM 43015BCM 43015
OSRTOSRTOS
USBUSB-CUSB-C
MicrophoneYesYes
Music ControlsYes Yes
Quick ChargeYesYes
Speakers2 wayNo

The Samsung Galaxy Buds Live and Galaxy Buds Pro are the Korean manufacturer’s first active noise-canceling headphones. However, the quality of this feature diverges greatly from pair to pair, largely due to their format.

It must be said that the Samsung Galaxy Buds Live are open-fit headphones, that is to say with an open format. Concretely, they therefore only offer very low passive insulation, as we saw earlier. The ear canal is therefore not sealed and ambient sounds can pass around the earpiece to reach the eardrum. Even if Samsung does offer an active noise reduction function on its headphones, it is clearly anecdotal, not sufficient to filter the noise that passes around the headphones.

The Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro are in-ear headphones with silicone tips that will seal the ear. Even if they are equipped with vents – also present on the Buds Live – allowing air to pass to avoid the clogging effect, the passive isolation here comes in support of the active noise reduction. We, therefore, have much more effective noise cancellation than on the Galaxy Buds Live, even if it does not reach the level of some competitors.

When it comes to audio quality, it’s day and night between Galaxy Buds Live and Galaxy Buds Pro, not just in terms of built-in speakers but signature sound or audio quality.

The Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro benefit from two separate transducers for the bass, 11 mm in diameter, and for the treble and mids, 6.5 mm in diameter. Enough to allow the headphones to offer a very balanced sound, but above all perfectly detailed on all sound frequencies. The Galaxy Buds Pro thus offers a particularly chiseled sound in the treble, with bass that remains round and very pleasant. Logical, since each type of frequency benefits from its own speaker.

The Galaxy Buds Live clearly do not arrive at this level of detail. Samsung headphones feature a single 12mm transducer, combined with a bass channel. The result is a sound that is very oriented towards the lowest frequencies and which struggles to put the mids or highs forward when necessary. Above all, if the bass is round and warm, details are lacking in vocals or higher-pitched sounds. It is as if Samsung had wanted to hide these weaknesses by putting the package on the bass.

Battery

Samsung Galaxy Buds ProSamsung Galaxy Buds Live
Battery TypeLi-PoLi-Po
Battery LifeUp to 8 hours
(28 with charging case)
Up to 8 hours
(29 with charging case)
Charge Time10min Charging/85 min Play5min Charging/60 min Play
Charging PortUSBUSB

When it comes to battery life Samsung offers 6 hours for its Galaxy Buds Live. For the Galaxy Buds Pro, Samsung offers this time of 6 hours with noise reduction and 8 hours without noise reduction. The Samsung Galaxy Buds Live was able to last a little longer than the Galaxy Buds Pro, with 7h37 of use, against 7h20 for the latest models.

Regarding the recharging of the headphones in the case, you will have to wait for 1h30 for the Galaxy Buds Live and 1h20 for the Galaxy Buds Pro. The boxes of both models can also be recharged by USB-C or with wireless charging.

Connectivity

Samsung Galaxy Buds ProSamsung Galaxy Buds Live
BluetoothBluetooth 5.0Bluetooth 5.0
SensorAccelerometer, Gyro, Proximity,
Hall, Touch, VPU
Accelerometer, Gyro, Proximity, Hall,
Touch, Grip, Voice Pickup Unit
NFCNoNo
Multi-Device
Connection
YesYes

Regarding the Bluetooth connection, both are Bluetooth 5.0 with SBC and AAC audio codecs, without aptX or LDAC. The Bluetooth connection is rather stable in both cases, although the headphones can temporarily lose the source when the smartphone is in a pocket, with the hand over it. However, Live Buds are even more finicky on this point. More annoying, the Galaxy Buds Pro has a hard time making calls with non-Samsung smartphones, with the call going from earphones to the smartphone speaker for no apparent reason.

On the functionalities and the use, it is, therefore, a draw between the two headphones which offer a number of similar functionalities, with some differences, but also major faults on both sides, whether it is the loss of connection of the Buds Live or voice calls – excluding Samsung smartphones – on Buds Pro.

Which is better!

At the end of this comparison, it’s a close match over several rounds between the two pairs of Samsung headphones, but a significant gap on others. We have indeed a draw concerning the criteria of autonomy, functionality, or design. However, on the other two points, which some will consider being the most important, it is the Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro that wins hands down sound quality and noise reduction.

Overall, while the earbuds are pretty close, it’s genuinely the Galaxy Buds Pro that is the best earbuds. They offer a much richer, more balanced, and detailed sound than their predecessors. In addition, the in-ear format – which may annoy some – has the advantage of guaranteeing convincing noise reduction where it does not exist on the Galaxy Buds Live.

There remains a strong argument for the Samsung Galaxy Buds Live: their price. The headphones were launched in August 2020 at a price of 240 USD, but they can now be found between 130 to 150 USD. However, despite this more attractive price, it is better to wait for the Galaxy Buds Pro to drop in price in turn, a few months after launch.

If you want to know more about these two pairs of true wireless headphones, you can find our tests:

 

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