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HyperX Alloy Origin 60 vs HyperX Alloy Elite 2: Mechanical Keyboard

Who has never touched a video game? Especially in this pandemic period, video games are becoming more and more mainstream, but playing you need good equipment. That’s good; we have exactly what you need! 

The HyperX Alloy Origin 60 and HyperX Alloy Elite 2 keyboard. This is a mechanical keyboard equipped with red and linear switches.

Pros and Cons

HyperX Alloy Origin 60HyperX Alloy Elite 2
Premium build qualitySimple, ergonomic design
Intelligent 60% layoutDedicated media buttons
Gorgeous metal caseNo dedicated macro keys
Mediocre ergonomicsNo wrist rest

Specification

HyperX Alloy Origin 60 HyperX Alloy Elite 2
Dimensions292.1 x 101.6 x 38.1mm 444 x 174 x 37.4mm
TypeMechanicalMechanical
Weight1.63 lbs (0.740 kg)3.38 lbs (1.535 kg)
Length 5.9 ft (1.8 m)6.0 ft (1.8 m)
ColorBlackBlack
ConnectivityUSB Type-CNot Detachable
MechanicalYesNo
RGB16,777,216 colors 16,777,216 colors
BluetoothNo No
NumpadNoYes
Latency wired 5.6 ms6.8 ms
SoftwareHyperX NGENUITYHyperX NGENUITY
CompatibilityWindows 10, 8.1, 8, 7Windows 10, 8.1, 8, 7

Design

The HyperX Alloy Origin 60 offered a simple design, black and made of aluminum. If HyperX is used to producing so-called “classic” keyboards (average size a numeric keypad), the brand has this time opted for a 60% format. There is no numeric keypad, no direction arrows (not totally), or INSERTDELETE keys. This can be practical in a restricted working environment (on a small desk, for example) and for people who do not use their keyboards in a reasonably limited way (games, Word, etc.)

The keyboard is equipped with a durable aluminum frame which adds a qualitative touch and weighs down the keyboard, and makes it more solid so that it does not move too much during large movements of the wrists. We remain as usual with HyperX on immaculate finishes. This keyboard is only available in black, allowing it to be introduced into any setup without doing anything.

The HyperX Alloy Elite 2 has a similar design to some of its big brothers of the same range, such as the Alloy Core RGB or the HyperX Alloy Origins. We would have liked to see a slight change, but the design is nevertheless adorable and efficient. On the top of the keyboard, we find a light strip covering the entire width of the keyboard placed below the bar containing the buttons, allowing the adjustment of the RGB and the multimedia keys.

The keyboard is equipped with an aluminum frame that adds a qualitative touch, weighs down the keyboard, and makes it more solid. We remain as usual with HyperX on immaculate finishes. This keyboard is available only in black color, which will allow you to slip into any desktop without doing the task—nothing to say on that side.

Typing Comfort

The HyperX Alloy Origin 60 is equipped with linear red switches. They make a fairly loud noise, which is a shame because they are nevertheless charming to type. These switches have a 3.8 mm travel, although they activate at 1.8 mm, which does not necessarily interfere, coming from a keyboard with red buttons.

We are here on an actuation force of 45 grams, which is just perfect: it allows us not to activate the keys when touched by mistake but also provides enjoyable typing.

The HyperX Alloy Elite 2 is elevable, thanks to pads placed below the keyboard, like all keyboards today. 

Since the keyboard is in 60% format, most of the missing keys have been placed on the present keys. Just press FN and your key at the same time to use it. While this is useful for some functions like Mute or Pause, it is tricky for most keys. Indeed, the positioning of the keys does not facilitate the use of certain secondary parts, mainly the directional arrows, which are complicated to use, particularly by using shortcuts for typing.

The HyperX Alloy Elite 2 is equipped with linear red switches. They make a reasonably reasonable noise, although it is noisy at night, like any mechanical keyboard noise. These switches have a 3.8 mm travel, although they activate at 1.8 mm, which does not necessarily interfere, coming from a keyboard with red buttons.

We are here on an actuation force of 45 grams, which is just perfect: it allows us not to activate the keys when touched by mistake but also provides enjoyable typing.

Like all keyboards today, the HyperX Alloy Elite 2 is elevable thanks to pads placed below the keyboard, which is still appreciable because most people prefer to write with the raised keyboard. In conclusion, we are here on an excellent typing comfort.

Backlight

HyperX Alloy Origin 60– Now let’s move on to everyone’s favorite part, the backlighting (long live the tunning). In addition to helping typing in the dark, it adds a lot of style to the keyboard. All the keys are backlit here, with a high-performance RGB backlighting that illuminates the entire key. The keys to adjust it is located on the front of the key. Just press FN  to use the brightness and color profile keys.

There are three color profiles: a “wave” mode, a wave mode with flatter and less luminous colors, and a completely off profile.

HyperX offers us a driver: HyperX NGenuity, which also allows you to customize the predefined effects and to be able to create your impact to your liking through various settings such as colors or speed. We would have liked to download profiles created by the community as already offered by Logitech, but you already have something to do nice things here.

HyperX Alloy Elite 2- One element that strongly contributes to the design of the keyboard is the backlight. Indeed, it makes it possible to locate the keys in the dark and add an incomparable style to the keyboard. This RGB is excellent: it is efficient and illuminates the entire key. There are three buttons on the upper left of the keyboard to adjust the RGB. The first is used to adjust the intensity of the RGB, which is adjustable in 4 different steps.

According to the effects you have configured in the driver, there is a button allowing you to switch between the different color profiles, which we will talk about later. The last button will enable him to activate the gaming mode, which deactivates specific keys in play, particularly the Start key, to avoid Windows reminders in the middle of the game.

The HyperX, NGenuity software also allows you to customize the predefined effects to create your impact on your image through various settings such as colors or even the angle. We would be able to load the effect made by the community as already offered by Logitech, but you already have something to have fun with this software.

Software

Compatible with most keyboards, the HyperX Alloy Origin 60 is consistent with the HyperX NGenuity driver. It allows you to configure your RGB profiles with the colors, speed, or angle you want. There are also preset modes that you can select, such as Breathe mode or Confetti mode. However, we would have appreciated downloading profiles created by the community, which would add a little more creativity.

The driver also allows you to assign keys to a macro, for example, a keyboard or mouse function, to add multimedia crucial or even a Windows shortcut, in short, a wide choice of things to (re) program. Offer to you. Note that it is also possible to deactivate the key.

The HyperX Alloy Elite 2 also offers the possibility of being personalized via their HyperX NGenuity driver. This driver firstly will enable you to configure the RGB of the keyboard via a range of effects proposed by default, such as BreathConfetti or Wave, but also to customize the predefined effects offered by HyperX. HyperX NGenuity also allows you to create your effect.

This software also allows you to assign keys to a macro, for example, a keyboard or mouse function, add a multimedia key, or even a Windows shortcut, in short, a wide choice of things to (re) program. Offer to you. Note that it is also possible to deactivate the key.

Conclusion!

We’re starting to get used to it, but HyperX hits once again with its Alloy Origin 60 keyboard. Although trying out a new format, the brand has used its experience to offer a qualitative keyboard in almost all respects.

HyperX hits once again very hard with its Alloy Elite 2 keyboard. It combines both optimal typing comfort, a perfect design but also a mighty RGB. Nothing more to say except hats off; it’s an excellent job.

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