Connect with us

AUDIO

Oppo Enco Air vs Oppo Enco W51: TWS Earphones

Oppo Enco Air is another truly wireless headphone that, in terms of appearance, as well as the possibilities offered, try to imitate Apple AirPods. Does this tactic make sense in combination with a much lower price? How does Enco Air perform in everyday use?

A simplified version of the excellent Enco X, the Oppo Enco W51 offers a smooth dive into active noise reduction on True Wireless headphones. 

Oppo Enco AirOppo Enco W51
Lightweight and comfortableGood quality microphones
Good battery lifeGood ANC
No ANCIP54 rated
Very basic controls Very basic controls

General

Oppo Enco AirOppo Enco W51
BrandOppo Oppo
TypeIn-EarIn-Ear
ColoursMisty White, Black, BlueFloral White, Starry Blue, Aqua Blue
Battery lifeUp to 24 hoursUp to 24 hours
Weight40.4g55.5g
ConnectivityBluetoothBluetooth

Design

TypeIn-EarIn-Ear
WirelessYesYes
Noise CancellingNoYes
Weight40.4g 55.5 grams
Foldable DesignNoNo

Oppo Enco Air- These are typical wireless headphones consisting of one element. We are dealing with white, shiny plastic, so characteristic of this type of construction. There is no place for any silicone inserts here because the headphones are not in-ear but only in-ear.

Oppo Enco Air, despite its universal design, is very comfortable. The manufacturer made sure they were also light, so we forgot that we had them in our ears after a while. A 3- or 4-hour music session with this equipment is pure pleasure.

The headphones are controlled via touch panels. Touch detection, however, leaves a lot to be desired, and we often activate the wrong thing. For example, the software sometimes detects only two instead of three taps and switches the number to the next one.

Fortunately, the manufacturer gave up the one-tap gesture, so accidentally activating the function while tweaking the handset is out of the question. However, the control itself is far from ideal, although it is good that the application can adjust the operation of individual gestures.

The headphone charging case is standard size, which means it fits in a trouser pocket. So you can take them with you almost anywhere. Unfortunately, the design of the box itself leaves something to be desired. The top flap is made of a slightly transparent, milky plastic, so we can see the headphones inserted inside. The problem is that it looks very cheap.

In addition, the case cannot be faulted – it just works. The headphones stay in place well. There is also a diode indicating work and a USB-C slot for charging the battery.

Oppo Enco W51- It’s hard to fall in love with the Oppo Enco W51 by their design alone. It must be admitted, they resemble, from a distance, several Chinese headphones released more or less in the wake of the Airpods (even if the design is far from it). A not very inspired product, going to something simple: stem and the main body in the shape of a small bean, in-ear with a slightly inclined cannula. We could extend this observation to the load box, of somewhat arbitrary shape and tones, compactness as a bonus.

In contrast, Oppo is doing quite well in terms of manufacturing. The plastic is relatively light but well-assembled, not too cheap, shiny (except the inner side, matt), but not too messy. An entry / mid-range that is not up to the benchmark like the Creative Outlier Air or the Cambridge Melomania does not do less well than the Huawei Freebuds 3i. A bit of the same observation with the charging box, correct, nothing more. The hinge doesn’t leave too much play, but the hood feels light.

The comfort and placement of the headphones (in the ears and the box) are as classic as it is effective. Like most rod models, the ear balance is done automatically; there is almost no need to screw on the mouthpiece. Quite close to semi-intra comfort, due to the very short cannula, the headphones hold in place without having to sink deeply. In addition, the slightly oval shape of the tip/cannula pair seems to slightly reinforce (as on the Enco X) the symbiosis between hold and comfort. Four sizes of silicone ear tips come with the Enco W51, which brews a vast range of human ears. Once the right size is found, the outfit is frankly excellent, almost sufficient for actual sports use.

Features

USBUSB-CUSB-C
MicrophoneYesYes
Music ControlsYesYes
Quick ChargeYesYes
IPX RatingIPX4IP54
Driver12mm7mm
Frequency range20Hz-20,000Hz20Hz ~ 20kHz
Stereo speakersYesNo

Oppo Enco Air connects to a phone or other device thanks to Bluetooth version 5.2. Pairing is quick and hassle-free. After removing the headphones from the case, the phone is automatically recognized. It is worth noting that each earpiece connects to the phone separately, which is an additional advantage. Music was played even at a distance of two thick walls from the sound source.

The Enco X, admittedly more expensive, Oppo seems to take great pleasure in limiting the ergonomics of the headphones as much as possible. Apart from using very reactive optical sensors (but not deactivate) for the pause / automatic play, the Enco W51 does not exploit their touch surface’s possibilities and the dedicated HeyMelody application.

The touch surface works with small taps, so it is not possible to slide your finger for a possible volume adjustment on the fly. But above all, only double, and triple taps exist, so two functions per earphone. Forget about simple taps and long presses.

By default, a double-tap triggers the next track on the right earbud and toggles ANC mode on the left earbud. The triple tap is only used in both cases to call the default voice assistant of the smartphone. The precision is relatively reasonable but already far from perfect.

Unfortunately, the dedicated HeyMelody application is at the opposite extreme. It is entirely useless and useless. With its help, you can only view the charging status of the headphones and change the operation of the touch panels. There is no equalizer or even dedicated listening modes. And these headphones would be helpful.

Battery

Battery Type440mAh Lithium-Ion480 mAh Lithium-Ion
Battery LifeUp to 24hUp to 24h
Charging PortUSB Type-CUSB Type-C
WirelessQi Wireless Charging Qi Wireless Charging

Oppo Enco Air- The manufacturer also put a lot of effort into the battery. While the headphones themselves offer about 4 hours of listening to music on a single charge, with the case, we can recharge them up to 5 times so that the final operating time can oscillate around an impressive 24 hours.

The case supports fast charging, and when connected to the power for about 10 minutes, it can accumulate energy for about 8 hours of listening, which is a considerable advantage, especially if you are in a hurry and want to make music with you.

Oppo Enco W51- Oppo announces “only” 3 hours 30 minutes with ANC in a single charge, 4 hours without ANC, and between 20 and 24 hours including the charging case. The number of recharges via the box, which is very important given its size, suggests that the battery’s capacity integrated into the headphones is short.

Without reaching the approximately 2 hours 30 minutes of the Freebuds 3i, the Oppo Enco W51 barely got the 3 hours 10 minutes in practice (via ANC).

Audio Quality

How is Oppo Enco Air? When you put the headphones in your ears for the first time, it seems pleasant and balanced, with a slightly withdrawn bass that does not come to the fore.

Later, longer music sessions only confirm this impression. The headphones play more on the warm side. At lower volume settings, they are polite and downright enjoyable. However, listening to more energetic tracks louder reveals the first drawbacks of the set: the upper parts of the sound become much more dominant, the bass escapes somewhere, and the treble becomes squeaky and a bit irritating.

The headphones reproduce a pretty broad stage, which can successfully fit many instruments. They can be distinguished from each other. The sound also gives an excellent sense of spaciousness.

Then the bass pleasantly accompanies the upper tones and can even bring out something. With more robust sounds, however, it gets too flat for this price range. So these are not headphones for listening to even DNB, but they are much more suitable for calm house, pop or rap.

The sound became less flat, a bit deeper and even more pleasant. There is a potential in Oppo Enco Air, but you need to get it out because the factory settings are very average.

The headphones reproduce a pretty broad stage, which can successfully fit many instruments. They can be distinguished from each other. The sound also gives an excellent sense of spaciousness.

The built-in microphone also deserves praise, reducing noise using a dedicated artificial intelligence algorithm. 

The Enco X are in the best sound in their price range, the Enco W51 are certainly less ambitious because carried by a single dynamic transducer of 7mm, but succeed already very well in their bet.

A good notch below their big brothers (equipped with a balanced armature transducer for this frequency) in the treble, the W51s are already quite comfortable in this sector, far from most of the competitors’ artificial rendering less than 120 USD. There is a slight spike in the treble, but without exaggeration, to bring a little more clarity to the listening.

Not aggressive, the W51 puts the bass slightly forward, sloping towards the mids, which gives a reasonably dynamic sound but is not sharp. A significant nuance is still there since this bass/midrange management is slightly different if the ANC is activated or deactivated. Off, the slope is smoother, the low-mids / mids hardly set back, resulting in a very balanced sound.

The low-mids / mids are a little more indented with ANC, resulting in a slightly more timid sound, although the difference is not huge. Still, if the ANC is not essential in a given situation, it is preferable to cut it for better sound quality.

There is more impact in this range, the Creative Outlier Air V2, for example, but the transducers used by Oppo are both quite technical and intelligently tuned (especially ANC off). The model has some similarities with the LG FN7 and FN6, offering a certain smoothness in the listening but allowing itself to be more dynamic and open.

Connectivity

BluetoothBluetooth 5.2Bluetooth 5.0
CodecsSBC, AAC SBC, AAC
NFCNoNo
Wireless range10 meters 10 meters
Multi-DeviceNoNo

Conclusion!

Costing around 100 USD, Enco Air is a successful attempt to release simply good equipment. The headphones are very comfortable, have a durable battery and are solidly made (maybe apart from the cheap cover of the case).

In terms of sound, it is a bit worse, and we deal with too dominant treble, but playing in the external equalizer does the trick and restores a pleasant sound.

The Oppo Enco W51 is a complete and affordable headphone. A less ambitious and more affordable version of the Enco X. has already been a charming technical sound, efficient ANC technology, and excellent comfort for a complete experience.

A product that had everything to be perfect, but the very low autonomy and overly limited orders leave it at the gates of excellence.

AUDIO

1MORE ComfoBuds Pro Review: Affordably ANC

The ComfoBuds Pro, 1More is now delivering a design change towards a full-fledged in-ear. And although the two earbuds are very similar, there are apparent differences. Which are they?

As already mentioned, the Pro model is based on the Non-Pro version. That means we are dealing with a chopstick design again. This measures 42 x 17 x 20 mm (L x W x D) . 1More dares to approach a blue version with the Pro version. There are then three colors from Aurora Blue ,  Titanium Black, Mica White. 

In terms of color, the headphones are stylish in every variant.  The relatively dark lacquer on the earbuds looks almost like metal, but plastic is actually used.

Charging station (450 mAh, 5V)
3 pairs of silicone attachments (XS, S, L)
USB Type-C to USB-A charging cable (50 cm)
Plastic carrier bag (10.5 x 8 cm)
1More Bear Stickers
Multilingual operating instructions

PROSCONS
Multiple noise cancellation modesNo aptX
Good sound, strong bassExpensive
Good voice quality
BT 5.0, SBC, AAC & IPX4 rating

Specification

1MORE ComfoBuds Pro
$CHECK PRICE
Brand1MORE
ReleasedMarch 15, 2021
ModelComfoBuds Pro
Weight0.141 ounces
Dimension1.65 x 0.94 x 0.82 inches
TypeIn-Ear
ColorsAurora Blue, Titanium Black, Mica White
Driver13.4 mm dynamic driver 
ANCYes
Foldable DesignNo
MicrophoneYes
Water resistanceIPX4 rating
Music ControlsANC Strong/Mild/OFF, Transparency,
Wind Noise Resistant
Impedance32 Ω
Bluetooth5.0
CodecHFP / A2DP / AVRCP
Frequency2.400 GHz ~ 2.4835 GHz
Charging Time2 Hours
Battery capacity50 mAh
Battery LifeUp to 20 Hours
Connector TypeWireless
CompatibilityWindows, Playstation, XBOX

Design

At the upper bending point of the style, the touch area is delimited by a different place. The microphone communication is, as usual, at the lower end of the stem and is turned slightly towards the mouth. There is also a two-color status LED at the end of the handle, but it only lights up in the station. The primary microphone is joined by another one directly on the driver and one above the touch surface.

Inside, there is an opening for pressure compensation and the area for the infrared proximity sensor, which detects whether the earbuds are being worn – sometimes even when they are on a table. The two charging contacts are also recessed inside, indicating that the earbuds are not placed in the station.

The 6 x 4 mm loudspeaker output is provided with a red aluminum grille, allowing other plugs. There is usually space in the charging cradle for attachments made of molded foam, but you need narrower attachments. With the larger ones, the station can no longer be closed.

The case measures 80 x 38 x 30 mm (L x W x H), but is still made of plastic. There was a downgrade for the hinge, which is now made of plastic instead of aluminum. The red-colored USB Type-C charging port has remained. A small multi-colored status LED was installed directly and in the middle below the notch for the opening. Inside there is the well-known pairing button and the socket for the earbuds.

Of course, the Pro version is also well processed and hardly allows any criticism. The design can be described as ergonomic and almost completely dispenses with edges. Transitions between the materials are easily noticeable here and there. It is a pity that the lid lacks a snap-in point at the maximum opening angle, so this closes relatively easily.

With the high-priced 1More models, the packaging is always an eye-catcher. Less from the outside because the different cardboard boxes are very similar. The concept drawings of the buds are shown inside again. 

Connectivity

Another feature that suggests that the ComfoBuds Pro is very close to the normal ComfoBuds is the feature list. We get Bluetooth 5.0 with SBC and AAC codec, no aptX. This is a bit of a shame for the Pro at the significantly higher price point.

The same applies to the 13.4 mm dynamic driver. So you can assume that this is almost identical to the normal model. After all, 1More recognizes the opportunity and also integrates ANC. We use the raw data table to clarify whether the ComfoBuds convince us this time.

1More also has some settings that can be made via the app to adjust the sound profile.

ANC is available in several stages. These include “medium”, “strong”, “transparent” and “wind”. You can only hear a few differences between medium and strong. The damping is of course not quite as strong with medium. This mode, which is intended for rather quiet places, is not really worth it.

Different sound profiles can be selected via the equalizer in the 1More MUSIC app. In addition to Bass Boost and Bass Reduce, there are some other profiles, each with two levels. Here, among other things, the slightly restrained heights can be amplified, giving them the kick they need.

The ComfoBuds Pro needs their station to carry out the pairing, but the head in the station is not a must. When opening the charging case, the earbuds switch to pairing mode. If the device is already known, it will be connected again immediately, and new devices can now establish a connection.

The earbuds, of course, are controlled via the touch field on the outside. The following settings are possible as standard.

Tap R / L twice: pause / play

Press R / L for 3 seconds: ANC-strong / transparency / off

Tap R / L three times: Voice Assistant

Tap R / L twice, for a call: accept / hang up

As you can see, the controls are quite limited. In this case, it doesn’t matter because everything can be freely selected via the app except for switching the ANC modes, and even these can be adjusted to determine which ANC modes are chosen yourself.

App – 1More Music

1More is known to have two apps on the high edge. 1More MUSIC and 1More Assistant. The 1More Music app is your choice if you want to get the most out of your earbuds. Both are simply downloaded from the Google Play Store.

The app has a simple structure. Without a start page, you will land directly on the overview page of the earbuds. You can switch the ANC modes manually, choose how the proximity sensor should react, or activate the equalizer and change the touch control.

Audio Quality

3 microphones per earbud are built into the 1More ComfoBuds Pro. Although only one is responsible for the direct recording of the speech, the other two improve the noise cancellation quality.

The ComfoBuds Pro showed a similar picture to the normal version in several test phone calls but goes one step further with an additional microphone.

Voices are recorded again clearly and distinctly, and background noises are usefully eliminated. Compared to the normal ComfoBuds, the Pro do a better job when it comes to heights and sudden peaks in the background noise. These are not entirely suppressed but are intercepted much better.

Longer conversations are no problem with the ComfoBuds Pro. The partner should not notice much of your surroundings and at the same time receive a comparatively natural-looking voice.

The ComfoBuds Pro also does not have an unlimited range. 20 meters are also easy here, but then the connection breaks off quickly.

Comfort

Although the ComfoBuds and the ComfoBuds Pro look almost identical, 1More has incorporated slight design adjustments. Nuances have been changed, little things have been adjusted, and an angle has been readjusted here and there. This means that the ComfoBuds Pro sits much more comfortably, even for a long time.

The weight remains close to the previous model at 5.2 grams and because part of the load is now in the ear canal, this low weight is even further divided.

In contrast, the charging station has become a good deal “heavier” at 40 grams. Since the shape has only changed minimally here, it goes largely unnoticed in your pocket.

After all, the headphones themselves are also splash-proof. You get an IPX4 certificate. The station should be kept away from the water if possible.

Battery

In addition to a 50 mAh battery per earbud, a 450 mAh battery is used in the station. Despite the large case, the battery is only increased by 40 mAh. That, in turn, is enough for full charges of the earbuds, plus something on top. When charging, the station then needs almost 2 hours for 100%.

The earbuds, on the other hand, are fully charged again after just under an hour. At 50% volume, you can get a good 5 hours with the earbuds if ANC is switched on. This is an excellent value that some other headphones can only achieve without ANC.

Conclusion!

1More was more convincible with the ComfoBuds Pro than with the normal ComfoBuds. Most of the negative aspects of the half-open version are eliminated with the Pro version. Nevertheless, you expect a little more for $100. There is no high-quality codec to minimize possible compression, and the sound test lacks that feeling that knocks you out when you start your favorite song.

The sound of the ComfoBuds Pro is excellent, but you can also do it the safe way instead of, for example, working out the highs properly. Otherwise, there is not much you can do wrong here.

Overall, the 1More ComfoBuds Pro gets a recommendation. Perhaps one is waiting for an offer in which the earbuds slip into more competitive realms.

Continue Reading

AUDIO

OneOdio Studio Pro C Wireless Review: Affordable

We haven’t heard from OneOdio for a long time after the grand debut on our site. Then came the Super EQ, a new sub-brand from OneOdio, and it disappointed us a bit. Now OneOdio wants to prove to us once again that you can produce excellent and affordable over-ear headphones.

This review looks at the OneOdio Pro C Wireless ( or OneOdio Studio Wireless C Y80B ). For less than $50, these headphones combine two worlds and offer wired and wireless transmission. You can find out in the test whether the balancing act works with this model.

Packaging has so far been more helpful at OneOdio. This also applies to the small box in which the Studio Pro C Wireless is offered. There isn’t much to see here, and there aren’t any big surprises inside either.

Package included:
Studio headphone.
2m audio cable with boom mic&volume control.
Dual 3.5mm “Y” extended cable.
Micro USB charging cable.
User manual.
Portable bag.

PROSCONS
Comfortable to wearMicro USB and no aptX
Large battery, long runtimeEarpads could be bigger
Good price/performance

Specification

OneOdio Studio Wireless C Y80B
$CHECK PRICE
BrandOneOdio
ReleasedOver the Ear
ModelStudio Wireless(Y80B)
Weight401 g
Dimension6.65 x 5.67 x 4.13 inches
TypeWireless
ColorsBlack
Driver50 mm Neodymium
ANCYes
Foldable DesignYes
MicrophoneBuilt In+line-in
Water resistanceNo
Music ControlsYes
Impedance32 ohm
Sensitivity110±3dB
BluetoothBluetooth 5.0
CodecHFP/HSP/A2DP/AVRCP
Frequency20-20,000 Hz
Charging Time4-5 Hours
Battery LifeUp to 80 hrs
Connector TypeWired & Wireless
CompatibilityWindows, Playstation, XBOX

Design

If you look at the headphones, you can see old friends. The Pro 50 & Pro 10 Studio already had an identical design. Here you save a lot of design costs, but the aha effect when unpacking is no longer so great.

The headphones earbuds are structured in synthetic leather. Both are also lined with a lot of molded foam. The headband can be extended to the left and right in 9 steps or the equivalent of 3 cm.

 

Both sides of the headphones are provided with joints in order not only to fold the OneOdio Studio Pro C but also to turn the driver itself by 180 °. All essential connecting elements are made of plastic.

Connectivity

The Studio Pro C can handle both Bluetooth and a 3.5 mm jack, a control panel on the right earpiece consists of a plus button, a minus button, and a multifunction button. The proprietary 3.5 mm jack connection is located directly below it. OneOdio provides you with a suitable jack cable and microphone. The connection is proprietary because the jack plug is particularly thick to avoid unintentional pulling out or loosening by carrying. Still, if you have a relatively narrow jack cable, this will also fit into the opening.

The status LED for the wireless connection is also located between the buttons and the AUX connection. There is a built-in microphone facing towards the mouth, which is only active during the wireless connection.

There is nothing on the left, apart from the power connector for charging the battery. Unfortunately, OneOdio still relies on a micro-USB connection for the Studio Pro C Wireless, no longer up-to-date. Here you should consider not simply rereleasing the headphones as a Type-C variant.

At least with our test model, OneOdio was a bit sloppy because the two cushions for the ears are different sizes. While the said pad on the left is thicker, the ear on the right gets more space in the headphones but is not so thickly padded. Apart from that, there are no other mistakes. But the same design is not exciting either.

In addition, the OneOdio Studio Pro C Wireless is not offered in different colors. It should only be black. A bit strange if you consider that the Pro 10 Studio, almost identical in construction, without a Bluetooth module, is offered in umpteen different versions.

The OneOdio Studio Pro C Wireless practically supports two pairing methods. On the one hand, the wired, on the other hand, the wireless one via Bluetooth. The former is very simple. Take an AUX cable and a device with a suitable connection to hand (which should now be the bigger hurdle in the mobile sector) and plug the cable into both devices, done.

But the connection via Bluetooth is also simple. The headphones are activated via the multifunction button, and a confirmation tone sounds after a few seconds. After switching on, the over-ear headphones immediately switch to pairing mode and can now be found in the Bluetooth menu. There is no voice output.

Audio Quality

SBC and AAC are supported. In addition, comes Bluetooth 5.0 for use. With headphones in this price range, the absence of aptX isn’t that tragic, but it’s still a shame. OneOdio also advertises the 50 mm drivers. According to the statement, the neodymium magnets provide stereo hi-fi sound and, of course, super-rich bass. Well, let’s see if that’s true.

The buttons on the headphones do not work in wired mode and are only intended for Bluetooth control. The button on the cable functions as a pause/play button.

  • Hold the multifunction button for 5 seconds: on / off
  • Press the multifunction button once: pause/play Press the multifunction button for 3 seconds: voice assistant
  • Press the plus button once: increase the volume
  • Hold down the plus button for 2 seconds: next track
  • Press the minus button once: decrease the volume
  • Hold down the minus button for 2 seconds: previous track
  • Press the plus and minus buttons simultaneously for several seconds: reset pairing history
  • Press the multifunction button once, for a call: accept/hang up

The functions are manageable but cover the entire audio control, including volume control. At least in wireless mode, you can operate the music player without using your smartphone. OneOdio still does without an app. There are no firmware updates or an alternative control system, but they are not necessary with the OneOdio Studio Pro C Wireless.

Comfort

The OneOdio model makes a considerable amount of heat around the ears. There is no ventilation mechanism or the like. The OneOdio Studio Pro C Wireless also provides an excellent seal without having to rely on ANC.

The inside radius is only 4.5 cm; the padding is 2.5 cm wide and 2 cm thick. There is only limited space for my ears; they don’t quite fit in, which means they are pressed against my head. This can lead to discomfort after a long period of wear.

There is another polyester layer directly above the driver, unfortunately without padding. There is also no water protection. OneOdio would have preferred not to have seen the Studio Pro C Wireless underwater.

If you want to use the headphones for a long time, you should know that the OneOdio Studio Pro C is not the lightest, even if the weight is well distributed over the headband. The over-ear headphones weigh 260 grams.

Battery

As before, the wireless on the right earbud goes two ways. If you connect the over-ears via the aux cable, the wireless part is deactivated. The headphones then draw their energy from the host device battery.

If you use the Bluetooth connection, an integrated battery is, of course, used. OneOdio specifies this with a full 1500 mAh. However, the headphones with their 260 grams are significantly lighter than the recently tested Bang & Olufsen Beoplay HX, which in turn had a smaller and lighter battery with 1200 mAh.

The battery life specified at 80 hours also speaks in favor of a large battery. If you take the Bang & Olufsen Beoplay HX again for comparison, it looks wildly exaggerated. Here are 40 hours (B&O without ANC) against 80 hours (OneOdio, no ANC available), with only 300 mAh more.

If the OneOdio runs on battery, it will last an excellent 50 hours as long as you are in the medium volume range, which is enough for many occasions. If you increase the volume, the hours drop somewhat, but they can certainly stay within an adequate range of around 40 hours. So the battery is probably bigger, but not 80 hours.

If the OneOdio Studio Pro C Wireless has to be charged, you should bring some time with you. Almost 3 hours for a full charge is a house brand.

Conclusion!

Again a combination device from OneOdio and again a helpful companion. Compared to the Pro M Wireless, however, the differences are limited. The Pro M is equipped with a real microphone but with the same range of functions.

And there we are at the crux of the matter. Most of the elements are covered with the even cheaper Pro M Wireless. The sound also does better with the Pro M model, especially since the headphones are not so far apart in price that one could expect incredible leaps in quality.

If you look closely, only the battery power speaks for the Studio Pro C Wireless model. Those who rely on long mileage will probably be happy with these over-ears.

Ultimately, the price is usually decided. Both over-ears are often on offer and thus slide below the $40 mark. As a rule, the Pro M Wireless is still cheaper. Therefore, the Studio Pro C Wireless is not recommended unless you need these 50+ hours.

Continue Reading

AUDIO

Razer Kraken V3 X vs Razer Blackshark V2 Pro: Which is Better

The choice of high-quality, functional, and technological gaming headphones is not an easy task. And if you have to choose among wireless models, the complexity of searches increases significantly. That’s why we got so excited when the Razer brand released the second version of their famous Blackshark. Today we are comparing the Blackshark with the Razer Kraken V3 X.

The Razer Kraken V3 X is an entry-level wired gaming headset with 7.1 surround sound, USB connectivity, and stylish looks. In this review, we’ll explore how an inexpensive dedicated headset can improve your gaming experience.

And even though they are noticeably different from their predecessors who conquered the gaming world, which had a clear resemblance to aviation headphones, they have noticeably improved many external and internal characteristics. Lets check out.

Razer Kraken V3 XRazer Blackshark V2 Pro
Solid build quality and appearanceExcellent sound quality 
Succulently soft ear cupsFit well on the head
Great, microphoneDetachable microphone
Non-removable ear padsSolid and reliable build quality
Windows only softwareInconsistent bass and treble delivery

Specification

Razer Kraken V3 X Razer Blackshark V2 Pro
$CHECK PRICECHECK PRICE
BrandRazerRazer
ReleasedSeptember 22, 2020‎March 25, 2021
ModelRazer Kraken V3 X Razer Blackshark V2 Pro
Weight9.9 pounds1.58 ounces
Dimension3.55 x 6.78 x 3.55 inches6.5 x 3.94 x 7.88 inches
TypeOver-earOver-ear
WirelessNoYes
Colors BlackBlack
DriverTriForce 40mm DriversTriForce Titanium 50mm Drivers
ANCNoNo
Foldable DesignNoNo
MicrophoneBendable HyperClear CardioidRemovable Mic
Music ControlsYesYes
SpeakersYesYes
Impedance
Frequency Response
BluetoothNoNo
SoftwareRazer SynapseRazer Synapse
Battery Type
Connector TypeUSBWireless 2.4GHZ / 3.5mm

Design

The Razer Kraken V3 X is made of lightweight and durable plastic and weighs only 285 g. The headphones are entirely invisible on the head, even after prolonged use. The slider guides for adjusting the size are made of plastic; the travel is quite stiff. The inner part of the headband is covered with eco-leather with a soft filling.

The ear cups are medium in size, have one degree of freedom, no additional pivoting hinges are provided.

The side cups of the headphones are made with nice perforation; the logo with RGB backlighting is embedded in the center. Outwardly, the headphones look significantly more expensive than they cost.

On the left side, there is a microphone on a flexible boom. His teammates appreciated his work perfectly; the voice was heard loud and clear.

The luminous Razer logo is embedded on the sides of the cups; the backlight color is constantly changing. There is an engraving with the brand name on the top cup of the headband.

 

Even the packaging on the Razer Blackshark V2 Pro grabs attention, not to mention the headphones themselves. Their box is made of black and acid-green matte cardboard. It is a pleasant combination that attracts attention. The box shows the headphones themselves and information about their main characteristics. It opens like a box, and inside they lie on a black background – the Razer Blackshark V2 Pro headphones.

Included with the main star of the attratction is a thin bag for transportation, which in general will not protect the accessory from damage. There are also two wires in a fabric braid: one for recharging the gadget, the other for turning it into wired headphones with a slight hand movement. In case they suddenly sat down, for example, or, more likely, for use with devices that cannot be plugged into a USB receiver. It seems to me that it will be convenient to store these wires in the transport bag.

The earbuds look very stylish, although some elements raise concerns about their durability. But, looking ahead. The metallic thin black elements that connect the ear cushions to the soft headband, although they look flimsy, actually perform very well. The headphones are almost entirely black, except for the button design on the left ear cushion. The bowls are made of matte plastic, very similar to the one Razer uses for its mice. This material is delightful to the touch and completely non-marking.

Comfort

The Kraken V3 X ear cushions are filled with soft memory foam and covered with soft-touch eco-leather and soft fabric on top. The material is well ventilated, the skin under the headphones hardly sweats. The depth of the ear pads is sufficient to make your ears feel comfortable.
Unfortunately, the ear pads are not removable.

We could not immediately find a comfortable fit for the headphones, as it was not very snug. However, after a while, the ear pads adjusted, and the fit became more comfortable.

Passive soundproofing is at an average level; while playing or watching a movie, you will hear a significant proportion of external noise, if any. The depth of the Razer Kraken V3 X’s cups is quite comfortable.

Razer Blackshark V2 Pro- You need to talk about the ear pads in more detail, since they are thought out and implemented very worthily. The inside of the bowl is made as if from memory foam and covered with the same material as the headband inside. Apparently, the combination of these two materials made it possible to bring passive noise cancellation to a high level. Indeed, little is heard from the outside in them, especially when music is playing inside. Moreover, those around you will not hear anything from what will be broadcast in this headset.

And the cups are adjustable here. And although this whole structure of thin metal between the “ears” and the headband looks not too reliable, in fact everything is more than reliable. The fit at the ear cushions is perfect and will fit any head and ear shape. The Razer Blackshark V2 Pro as the number one headphone I’ve used. For reference: there are more than fifty of them.

In order to make such a massive headset almost invisible on the head, it was necessary to try hard. Yes, of course, the lion’s share of this merit is in a high-quality and well-thought-out adjustment system and comfortable soft large ear pads. But without light, well-chosen materials, the effect would not be the same. And the lack of a dangling wire under the chin is expensive. After all, with him, whatever one may say, in movements, especially sharp ones, you will be limited so as not to accidentally pull him out of the audio jack.

Connectivity

The Razer Kraken V3 X headphones do not require any unique settings. You need to connect the model to the USB port of your device. The headset works with a computer; Kraken V3 X can be connected, for example, to an Xbox or PlayStation.

Unfortunately, the connection cable is not removable. However, it is quite soft and has a braid made of pleasant rubberized material. For easy storage, a small rubber tie is provided on the cable, it is also non-removable, so there is no need to worry about getting lost. A protective cap is provided for the USB connector. If you suddenly have only the usual AUX headphone jack free, you will also have to purchase a USB – AUX + MIC adapter.

On the left earcup, there is a volume control and a button for turning on the microphone. The layout of the control, in my opinion, is excellent. If you put your palm on the left cup, your thumb hits the microphone on/off button. The microphone button has good travel, and you can tell by touch what position the switch is in.

For playback in the Razer Kraken V3 X headphones, 40mm drivers are responsible. Pseudo-3D soundstages are generated using intelligent audio signal processing. You only need to install the proprietary Razer software – it is free and available on the manufacturer’s official website. Unfortunately, only Windows OS is supported. As a MAC OS user, you will have to enjoy typical stereo sound.

In addition to providing 3D sound using the software, you can experiment with the equalizer settings.

The sound in the headphones during games pleasantly surprised me. Localization of actions in surround sound mode is entirely accurate. Hero steps, shots, or caterpillar sounds are perfectly positioned, adding new emotions to the gameplay.

The soft black headband is made of leatherette on the outside and fabric on the inside. On top of it, the name of the manufacturer’s brand is printed in large letters using embossing. On the left side are all the controls, including a very steep protruding analog volume control, which has a lock in the middle position and changes the volume only in the headphones. It can easily be groped blindly with a hand, and it seems to be one of the model’s chips. There are also two buttons here: an on / off switch and a microphone switch. In addition, there are micro-USB and 3.5-mm jack connectors.

Thanks to the presence of a USB transmitter, the communication quality, and range are very high here. There is no hint of sound compression, but everything works well, even through a couple of concrete walls. We recommend using these headphones in conjunction with the Razer Synapse 3 utility, which is unavailable if the headphones are connected via the jack. This will keep the microphone working. To turn on / off the headset, you need to hold down the power button for a long time. Using the utility, you can set auto shutdown after 15-60 minutes when idle.

Audio Quality

Low frequency tends to dominate the sound profile of gaming headsets, and the Razer Kraken V3 X headphones are no exception. Explosions of shells, thunder, drums are reproduced as dynamically as possible and slightly obscure the overall musical picture. The high frequencies, on the other hand, sound somewhat restrained. The clang of metal is conveyed quite confidently.

Mid-range sounds neutral, vocals and voice – confident and without distortion. This applies to both the general sound picture and the lines of other players. For its price category, the headphones sound very convincing, but it is better to choose something more classic for listening to music. The Razer Kraken V3 X is fun to play and comfortable to watch movies.

The dynamic 50mm TriForce drivers are responsible for sound production. They have a titanium-coated diaphragm. The sound here is excellent for audio: the music of different genres, games, films. The sound is balanced, with low surround frequencies in the background.

The microphone is inserted separately. This is very convenient since it can be removed if it is unnecessary. The bar is flexible and has a great memory effect, so if you adjust it once, you don’t have to worry about it anymore. The foam pop filter dampens exhalation, and the unidirectional microphone saves from external noise, as does the active noise suppressor on the other side. The application provides the ability to improve the sound quality of the microphone.

 

Continue Reading

Top2gadget is user-supported. We may receive a commission for purchases made.

Categories

More Topics

AUDIO7 hours ago

1MORE ComfoBuds Pro Review: Affordably ANC

The ComfoBuds Pro, 1More is now delivering a design change towards a full-fledged in-ear. And although the two earbuds are...

AUDIO8 hours ago

OneOdio Studio Pro C Wireless Review: Affordable

We haven’t heard from OneOdio for a long time after the grand debut on our site. Then came the Super...

TUTORIALS11 hours ago

What Is Aptx Audio Codec

The popularity of headphones raises the question for users of which models are better to choose and how they generally...

TUTORIALS14 hours ago

How To Bluetooth Works

Bluetooth or bluetooth (translated as blue tooth) is a technology for wireless data transmission . Bluetooth enables the exchange of...

WEARABLES2 days ago

Best Smartwatches for Seniors

Smartwatches and bracelets are convenient, and most importantly, handy gadgets that allow you to monitor your health effectively. They can...

AUDIO2 days ago

Razer Kraken V3 X vs Razer Blackshark V2 Pro: Which is Better

The choice of high-quality, functional, and technological gaming headphones is not an easy task. And if you have to choose...

WEARABLES3 days ago

Fitbit Charge 5 vs Fitbit Charge 4: Which is Better

After a series of leaks, Fitbit has announced a new generation of Fitbit Charge 5 fitness bracelets. This is the...

WEARABLES4 days ago

Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 vs Apple Watch Series 7: Which is Better

The Apple Watch Series 7 and Samsung Galaxy Watch 4, two advanced smartwatches with much to offer, now face each...

WEARABLES5 days ago

Amazfit GTR 3 Pro vs Amazfit GTR 3: Premium Smartwatch Comparision

The Amazfit GTR 3, the GTR 3 Pro, and the GTS 3 are already the third generation of the successful...

WEARABLES5 days ago

Ticwatch 3 Pro Ultra vs TicWatch Pro 3: Should You Upgrade?

Mobvoi has presented the new Ticwatch 3 Pro Ultra, which is now certified according to military standards; it also brings...

GAMING1 week ago

Difference Between: Gaming Chairs vs Office Chairs

Anyone who plays computer games on their gaming laptop, powerful gaming desktop computer, PlayStation, or Xbox game console, sooner or...

AUDIO1 week ago

Bose QuietComfort 45 Wireless Noise Cancelling Headset Review

Bose was once almost synonymous with the best active noise cancellation you could find. Now Bose is finally ready with...

Trending